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‘I was terrified’: Woman who was left with severe post-traumatic stress disorder after the Iraq War tells of her struggle with depression

Peta Murgatrioty has told of how she was left traumatised by her experience as a prisoner of war in Iraq.

The 25-year-old has been on a hunger strike since last October, after being left in solitary confinement for three weeks while she waited for an assessment on her mental health.

“I was so traumatised.

I was in such a state of shock,” Ms Murgitrioty told the ABC.

They put me into isolation for three days. “

They put me in solitary for three months.

They put me into isolation for three days.

They did a mental health assessment on me and I was just crying every day.”

The Australian military left her alone in solitary, but Ms Mungatriotys husband, Peter, has not been able to return home since returning from the war in March 2016.

He told the National Radio that his wife was still suffering from post-concussion symptoms.

“She was going through a lot of post- traumatic stress,” he said.

“There was a lot going on in her life.”

‘It was terrifying’ Ms Murgaatrioties ordeal began on December 20, 2016, when she arrived at her first post-war appointment at the Royal Australian Air Force’s (RAAF) Sydney Base.

The RAAF said she had been released from the base to go to an “enhanced psychiatric assessment”, and was assessed as a “high risk” for PTSD.

Ms Mugatriotie said she was told her symptoms were due to a traumatic experience with her unit, but she continued to suffer with post-shock symptoms.

At the end of January 2017, the RAAF asked her to stay at a military hospital for a further mental health evaluation.

“A lot of the people in my unit are very close friends of mine, and we knew what was going on, we knew she was in trouble,” Ms Kuruvatroy said.

But she was unable to get a “good psychiatric assessment” from the hospital, and was ultimately forced to spend three weeks in isolation.

“We were left to sleep in the cells,” she said.

By May, the Army had decided to allow Ms Mauratriot to stay with the RAPC in a psychiatric unit, as it wanted to “avoid any disruption to her medical and family life”.

“She had the opportunity to see her friends, her family, and she was allowed to go back to her own unit,” Peter Murgiatroy told the BBC.

“If she hadn’t been allowed to do that, I don’t think she would have had the chance to get that [psychiatric] assessment.”

Ms Mruatriotya said the army was not forthcoming with information about her mental condition.

“The Army was really, really tight-lipped about my mental health and what it was,” she told the RIA.

“You couldn’t get anything in advance from them.

You couldn’t talk to anybody.”

‘They were not willing to say what they were doing’ The next day, Ms Muaatriotis husband went to the army’s “enhancement centre” in the Australian Defence Force (ADF) base in Darwin, to speak to a psychologist who was helping with her mental state.

“When she walked in the door she was very calm, and it was a really good meeting.

She did, however, tell him that she had a mental breakdown the previous day, and that she wanted to talk to the RAC about it. “

But she was not willing at all to tell me anything,” Mr Murguatrioti said.

She did, however, tell him that she had a mental breakdown the previous day, and that she wanted to talk to the RAC about it.

“And she was adamant that she did not want to talk about it to anybody,” he added.

“At the end she was just very, very quiet.

She said, ‘I’m on the ROC [relief officer] and they don’t want me to talk.’ “

So I asked her, ‘What are you doing?’

And she said, [that] ‘yes, I am fine. “

I said, “Are you OK?

And she said, [that] ‘yes, I am fine.

I’m on my own.

I am happy, I’m happy’.” “I thought, ‘Oh, OK, well, then, why are you on the base?”‘

“Because they said, they didn’t want her to be there, and I don”

In fact, I think it was an absolute shock to me,” she says.

“Because they said, they didn’t want her to be there, and I don